Ok. So. Where do I even start with this dystopia tale.

It was a post apocalyptic/the future is now book. And it was wild.

A young woman, Lauren, is living in the 2020’s with her family, trying to stay alive. Which is easier said than done considering money is useless, food and water are scarce, the police are corrupt, and there are violent gangs of drug addicted crazy people wandering around. Aka dystopia. The drug of choice is a new strand that makes you completely cray and makes fire look really pretty. They light a lot of fires.

We spend a lot of time in the world building stage of this book. We know Lauren, her family, her neighborhood, her situation, really well. Except for one thing.

We never learn what happened to bring on the apocalypse.

But we do learn that Lauren has ‘truths revealed to her by the universe’ and she collects them together to someday build a new group of people who live by these ideals. Everyone calls it a cult and she spends a lot of time saying it isn’t. According to her they’re going to end up in space.

Then the unthinkable happens and Lauren is thrust into the wilderness with two neighbors and they go searching for a better place. At first they aren’t sure where they’re going, except North. And they aren’t sure what they’re going to do once they get there. Then comes a lot of walking and a lot of travel related problems. They need food and water, they need to stay safe, they need to keep moving. As they travel they collect more and more random people, until they’ve got quite a group.

This is some impressive summarizing if I do say so myself.

They manage to eat, drink water, and mostly live.

SPOILERRRRRRR one of the random people they picked up is an old guy who loves Lauren (as a refresher, she’s super young) and he just happens to have a ton of undeveloped land up North. They make it to the land where they discover his sister and her family have been killed. Bummer. Then have a discussion about whether they should stay there, and basically instill the cult, or if it’s too dangerous. They decided to stay, and that’s it.

At this point I think it’s important to let you know this is book one of a series. I did not know that initially and felt the cliffhanger ending was unfair.

But this one was so rough I’m also not going to read the second one.

The plot felt like a lot of dystopia novels, which is fine. I don’t expect everyone to reinvent the wheel. But it was missing some things I thought were important. Here are my two biggest complaints.

If we as a society are supposed to avoid this ever becoming a reality, you should probably tell us how this happened.

If you want me to care about the characters, you should probably make them sympathetic.

I’m also not sure if the Parable of the Sower from the Bible is at all connected to the story? Which is wack considering it’s named after it?

So in the words of the great Randy Jackson, it’s a no from me.